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Advances in Medical Oncology

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PetrylakDr. Daniel P. Petrylak, Professor of Medicine and Urology at Yale School of Medicine, has been a pioneer in the research and development of new drugs and treatments to fight prostate, bladder, kidney, and testicular cancers.

Prostatepedia spoke with him about advances in medical oncology for prostate cancer.

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What are the current points of controversy and/or trends in the field of medical oncology for prostate cancer?

The first controversy is over localized disease. There are really two forms of prostate cancer. There is the nonaggressive form that is not going to be lethal and that you’ll die with and not from. Then, unfortunately, there is the lethal form of the disease that kills about 30,000 men a year in the United States. The controversy is how do you treat these patients? How do you decide who to treat and who not to treat?

For advanced metastatic disease, there are controversies over the right treatments, the right sequences of treatments, when to use other hormones, and when to use other chemotherapies. There are a lot of questions that need to be answered.

Unfortunately, prostate cancer has always been behind other tumors. If you look back to the 1990s, there was about five times less funding for prostate cancer than breast cancer. We were behind in funding compared to other tumors, but have made significant strides in increasing money available for research.

We’re catching up in the area of personalized medicine. We didn’t really have markers a couple of years ago. But now we’re beginning to see markers—whether that be with BRCA mutations, BRCA-like mutations, or AR-V7—employed in the treatment of advanced metastatic disease to help select therapies. These approaches are in the advanced stages of development and have yet to be approved by the FDA. Those are the major controversies.

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Author: Prostatepedia

Conversations about prostate cancer.

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