Prostatepedia

Conversations With Prostate Cancer Experts

Living A Normal Life After Prostate Cancer

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Dr. Stephen Freedland is a urologist at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, California and the Director of the Center for Integrated Research in Cancer and Lifestyle, Co-director of the Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program and Associate Director for Faculty Development at the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute.

Dr. Freedland treats the whole patient and not just a man’s prostate cancer.

He frames this month’s conversations about stress, depression, and prostate cancer.

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Historically, the goal was to cure cancer. We don’t really cure other major medical problems like heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol: we manage them. Cancer, in general, and prostate cancer, in particular, are becoming chronic diseases. Occasionally, we need to do something more aggressive, but we really just need a management strategy so that people can live normal, healthy lives even after being diagnosed with cancer.

With this shift from quantity of life to quality of life comes an opportunity for us to have conversations about how prostate cancer and its treatments affect daily life. People are now younger at diagnosis than ever before. They’re still active. They’re still working. They’re still productive members of their families and of society.

How do we help them maintain that while providing the best cancer care? The challenge is how to marry those two. It’s not enough to focus on Gleason score, PSA, and stage. The focus is on the patient. On the person. It’s not just about the numbers.

I applaud Prostatepedia for delving into this subject matter with some very engaging conversations with some of the world leaders on the topic. I work very closely with Dr. Arash Asher at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. We focus now on nutrition, exercise, and psychosocial health. It’s really spectacular to see. Men are able to maintain much of their quality of life and sometimes feel better than ever.

At the same time, we’re realizing that what works for one patient will not necessarily work for another. There is no shortcut to sitting down with a patient, understanding his needs, goals, and desires, and then working together to come up with a care plan that manages his cancer and his side effects. We want to keep you psychologically strong and able to fight your cancer–but also to live your lives.

Subscribe to read our February conversations about stress, depression, and prostate cancer.

Author: Prostatepedia

Conversations about prostate cancer.

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