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Conversations With Prostate Cancer Experts

Cognitive Impairment + Prostate Cancer

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Dr. Alicia Morgans is a medical oncologist at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois. She specializes in treating advanced prostate cancer and is particularly interested in addressing treatment side effects.

Prostatepedia spoke with her about cognitive impairment, stress, and prostate cancer treatment.

What role do you think medical oncologists traditionally play in anticipating that patients might have these kinds of struggles? What role do you think the medical oncologist should play?

Dr. Alicia Morgans: That is a tricky question. I think, in general, medical oncologists have a lot of things on their plates. They’re trying to balance all of the side effects of therapy, the reason for doing a particular therapy, the complications that a therapy can cause that are medically dangerous, as well as where we go next if this treatment fails. I don’t know that they always take the time to dig deeply into questions about cognitive function, depression, or anxiety unless those things are very clear because a patient is complaining about them himself or a caregiver says it is a huge issue.

Medical oncologists have very short patient visits, especially for followups, and have many things going on that they’re trying to work through with patients. These cognitive changes are not always at the top of their list. However, it’s a critical part of our job and something that I take the time to do because of both my personal experiences and the way that I think medical oncologists should practice. That is not to say anyone else is wrong, but it is a really important part of my practice. This is something that patients are living with day to day. It’s something that needs to be addressed and can negatively impact their quality of life.

A patient’s experience of his quality of life is what really matters at the end of the day. Length of life and quality of life, to me, are both critically important. If you are not thinking clearly or you’re severely depressed or anxious—about your job, financial toxicity, or dying— you can’t live your best life. Helping optimize quality of life during treatment for cancer is a pivotal part of what we do. That being said, I don’t criticize any of my colleagues for missing discussions on this or myself when I’m having a day and running an hour and a half late, but it is something we should strive to do.

Are there ways to circumvent problems with cognitive function, or is it just a matter of identifying them early on and getting patients the help they need?

Dr. Morgans: I don’t know if there’s necessarily a way to completely avoid them, but we might, with some of the research being done, identify patient populations or individual patients who might be most susceptible to some of these side effects based on their genetics or based on the way they metabolize certain drugs.

If we can identify who may be most sensitive, we might be able to steer those men away from certain treatments and toward other treatments or delay treatment if that’s in their best interest and is a clinically reasonable choice.

Our goal is to provide men with a balance of best quality of life and longest length of life.

What we can do now is ask questions of our patients to diagnose these issues. We can ask, “How’s your mood? Are you feeling depressed? Are you feeling down?” We can figure out if they’re depressed or anxious.

If we talk to men and their caregivers about their daily life, we can treat these problems whether it is through pharmacologic therapy or counseling with a social worker, a psychologist, or a psychiatrist.

We can treat depression and anxiety.

Loss in cognitive function is a little more challenging. I have referred patients to behavioral or cognitive therapy (similar to what is recommended for patients post-stroke) to give them strategies for dealing with memory loss or thinking problems. I’ve had some success with that approach, but I would say the standard approach to managing cognitive decline is still being defined. This is the work that I am trying to do, because we still need to confirm which tools are best for measuring cognitive change, and then we need methods to prevent or reverse these issues.

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Author: Prostatepedia

Conversations about prostate cancer.

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