Prostatepedia

Conversations With Prostate Cancer Experts

Clinical Trials + You

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In May, Prostatepedia asks doctors, advocates, and patients why men with prostate cancer should consider joining clinical trials. Chances are you’ve never thought about entering a clinical trial. You and your doctor have hammered out a prostate cancer treatment plan that takes into account your particular cancer and which side effects you’re willing to live with and which you’re not. But a clinical trial? Most men never really think about joining a trial unless their own doctor brings it up—if he or she does at all.

But there are clinical trials available to men at every stage of the prostate cancer journey from new diagnosis to active surveillance to monitoring for potential recurrence to advanced disease. Some trials offer men access to a drug or therapy that they might not otherwise be able to get. Other trials help scientists learn about prostate cancer biology or genomics. All are important and all advance our understanding of prostate cancer with the aim of eventually eradicating the disease all together.

Understanding clinical trial terminology will be important as you evaluate whether or not you’re interested in joining a particular trial. A Phase I clinical trial generally looks at drug safety and includes a smaller number of patients. A Phase II trial collects preliminary data on whether a given drug works in men with prostate cancer. A Phase III trial collects further information about drug safety and effectiveness—usually in different populations, different dosages, and in combination with other drugs. Phase III trials can lead to a drug’s FDA-approval.

Reading–and then forwarding the issue of Prostatepedia to your doctor–is a great way to start a discussion about clinical trials. Be sure to take notes and do your own research afterwards until you’re sure you understand the pros and cons of each trial you’re considering.

Support groups—online and in-person—can be wonderful resources as you evaluate your options.

The bottom line is that it’s worth investigating if there is a clinical trial available for you at this time whether or not you decide to join one in the end. You’ll learn a lot about your options moving forward and may just find one that’s a fit.

Not a member? Join us to read the issue on May 1.

 

 

 

Author: Prostatepedia

Conversations about prostate cancer.

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