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Dr. Mohit Khera: Treating ED

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Dr. Khera, a urologist specializing in male infertility, male and female sexual dysfunction, and declining testosterone levels in aging men, is the Director of the Laboratory for Andrology Research and the Medical Director of the Executive Health Program at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas.

Prostatepedia spoke with him recently about current and emerging approaches to erectile dysfunction (ED) after prostate cancer.

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Khera

Why did you become a doctor?

Dr. Mohit Khera: Originally, I was a healthcare analyst. I did my MBA and then worked as an analyst in Boston for two years. I realized that it wasn’t very satisfying for me. I really wanted to be able to help other people and to help patients. I went to medical school and became a doctor. I have never looked back. It’s the best decision I ever made.

There’s something very gratifying about being able to help other people, particularly those who are in need and are in pain or hurting.

Have there been any particular patients who’ve changed how you see your role as a doctor or how you view the art of medicine?

Dr. Khera: There are numerous patients who stand out in my mind, particularly those who have suffered from prostate cancer and are trying to recover their lives, whether it be in terms of sexual function, incontinence, or even just keeping the cancer from coming back. It’s very challenging. These patients just

who is not very skilled or who does not do robotic prostatectomy quite frequently, their ED rates tend to be higher than someone who does the procedure on a regular basis. Surgeon skill is critical.

Typically, radiation does have a lower rate of ED initially, but several years down the road, the rate of ED can catch up and accelerates past the rate of ED from surgery.

We know that in androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) when you drop testosterone values, the risk for ED is significantly increased. Many studies show that you start losing nocturnal erections when the testosterone levels fall below 200. That’s exactly what happens when you give men ADT: ED rates should go up significantly.

Does erectile function come back after a man goes off ADT?

Mr. Khera: Yes, many times it does come back. The only problem is that not all men have their testosterone levels bounce back into the normal range after they stop ADT. Some men will actually have testosterone levels that remain in the low range. Of those men in whom levels do go up, whether they build up naturally or through testosterone supplementation, many will experience improvements in their erectile function once again.

Is there anything a man can do before treatment to prevent problems or reduce problems after treatment?

Dr. Khera: The concept of penile rehabilitation has been up for debate in my field. There are those who are proponents and those who don’t believe that it will help. I personally believe that penile rehabilitation is effective and will help patients recover their erectile function faster and more effectively.

In my program at Baylor College of Medicine, I start patients two weeks prior to the surgery on daily Cialis (tadalafil). I teach them how to use the vacuum erection device as well because I want them to use it after surgery. I check their testosterone levels before surgery, as some studies have shown that the testosterone levels do go up after a prostatectomy.

I also teach them the concept of penile injections just in case they need to use them after surgery if they’re not able to recover their erectile function.

There is a lot of counseling that goes on before the surgery. I put them on certain medications. I’m trying to prepare them for the surgery and to keep their tissue healthy and in the best condition possible.

There are a lot of doctors, though, who don’t do that kind of thing and who don’t talk about penile rehabilitation. Some aren’t even comfortable talking about ED with their patients except in the most cursory way. What would you say to a patient who’s encountered that? Should he go see someone who is a specialist in ED?

Dr. Khera: I think that patients should voice their opinions. If you look at this field 20 years ago, you realize there are three things that occur. A man wants to make sure that he gets his cancer out; he wants to make sure he can still get good erections; he wants to make sure that he’s not leaking urine after the procedure. Those are the three big categories of patient concerns.

In the past, many surgeons just focused on getting the cancer out and felt patients should be grateful for that. Yes, you may have some ED or incontinence, but we saved your life.

But now patients are very savvy and are demanding more. They’re demanding that they should have their cancer out and also have great erections and no incontinence after the procedure.

I think it’s very important when a patient has a diagnosis of prostate cancer that he discuss all three of these categories with his surgeon. They should discuss outcomes and the surgeon’s skill. They should discuss how many cases that surgeon has performed in this field.

Some patients in smaller communities don’t have access to doctors with your experience. Are there online resources for men in that position?

Dr. Khera: I think one of the best online resources is at http://www.sexhealthmatters.org. They have a phenomenal website with lots of literature and education on sexual medicine and rehabilitation. It’s an excellent resource that I share with my patients.

What about men who have already been through treatment and are suffering from ED? Which approaches seem to be most effective after which prostate cancer treatments?

Dr. Khera: There are many treatment options available to men with ED following a radical prostatectomy. The most common treatment options are PDE5 inhibitors. Those are called phosphodiesterase inhibitors—Viagra (sildenafil), Levitra (vardenafil), Cialis (tadalafil), and Stendra (avanafil).

These medications are very useful. Many of us give these medications on a daily basis to help men recover the nerves and penile tissue. I think it’s important.

Men can also use a vacuum erection device, which is exactly what it sounds like. It’s a vacuum that induces an erection. A band is placed at the base of the penis to maintain the erection.

Men can also use an injection therapy. We spend an hour in the office teaching them how to inject themselves with a very small diabetic needle. They inject into the base of the penis a solution that causes a very rigid erection. Then very early on they can start engaging in sexual activity.

I believe psychologically it’s very important that men start engaging in sexual activity early after surgery; it has a large psychological impact not only on the patient but also on the partner.

Other therapies include urethral suppositories called MUSE (alprostadil). These are placed into the urethra and dilate the penile tissue to give an erection.

Finally, I would say one of the best treatment options for many men is a penile prosthesis. We do perform this procedure. We place a penile implant into the penile tissue and a pump into the scrotum. Men can then pump saline into their penile tissue to induce an erection.

Isn’t it dangerous for a man to begin sexual activity soon after surgery? Is there any risk to him?

Dr. Khera: Typically in our practice, we like men to wait at least one month so that all the sutures heal and there is no risk of injury with the urethral anastomosis. We encourage men to start engaging in sexual activity one month after surgery.

Do you have any advice for men who are either worried about ED before going into treatment or who are struggling now?

Dr. Khera: There are two important things men should realize. First, prior to going into any type of treatment for prostate cancer, you should discuss ED outcomes with your doctor. Ask them what success have they had with ED. What is their plan for managing the ED if it does develop after the procedure?

Second, men who are already suffering from ED should know that there are excellent treatment options available. Men do not have to live with ED following a radical prostatectomy.

There are new treatment options emerging. We have started two studies, one with stem cell therapy. We take stem cells from men and inject them back into the penile tissue, with some benefit. We have another therapy called low-intensity shock wave therapy, in which we deliver shocks to the penile tissue. It does help recover erectile function.

There are many new treatment options on the horizon.

We’ve spoken about stem cell therapy before. I think you were just starting a trial.

Dr. Khera: I finished that trial and am now starting a Phase II trial. This first trial went extremely well. We’ll begin recruiting patients at the end of this year.

What we did not discuss last time was shock wave therapy. That has been out for multiple years and has gained a lot of success and media in the United States. Some of your readers may have seen commercials for it. We believe at this point that shock wave therapy should be used only in a research protocol until more data is available.

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Author: Prostatepedia

Conversations about prostate cancer.

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